Stephen perry inventor of rubber band-History of Elastic and Rubber Bands

On March 17, , Stephen Perry a British inventor and businessman received a patent for the first rubber band. Rubber band has been holding things together for the past years. Perry came up with the invention after Charles Goodyear introduced rubber to the world in Perry invented the rubber band to hold papers or envelopes together. Rubber bands are made by extruding the rubber into a long tube to provide its general shape, putting the tubes on mandrels, curing the rubber with heat, and then slicing it across the width of the tube into little bands.

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band

Rubber bands are used in the agricultural and the floristry industries - vegetables such as celery can be bunched together with rubber bands, which can also hold together bouquets. He made them Stephen perry inventor of rubber band forcing the rubber through a die a process known as extruding and into a long tube to provide the general long, thin shape. No bail for 25 RNC terror suspects. Very simply: by slicing hollow rubber tubing into narrow strips. What is surprising, however, is that he was not foresighted enough to secure the rights to them for the future, in the same way that he also failed to do so with the masticator — probably for secrecy reasons.

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Inventor Stephen Perry.

  • A rubber band also known as an elastic band , gum band or lacky band is a loop of rubber, usually ring shaped, and commonly used to hold multiple objects together.
  • On March 17, , Stephen Perry a British inventor and businessman received a patent for the first rubber band.
  • On this day in , the British inventor Stephen Perry received a patent for the rubber band.
  • It holds papers together, prevents long hair from falling in a face, acts as a reminder around a wrist, is a playful weapon in a pinch, and provides a way to easily castrate baby male livestock … While rubber itself has been around for centuries, rubber bands were only officially patented less than two centuries ago.
  • Cheap, reliable, and strong, the rubber band is one of the world's most ubiquitous products.

The History of Elastic and Rubber Bands. The ancient Mayan People used latex to make rubber balls, hollow human figures, and as bindings used to secure axe heads to there handles and other functions. Latex is the sap of various plants, most notably the rubber tree. When it is exposed to the air it hardens into a springy mass. The Mayans learned to mix the rubber sap with the juice from morning glory vines so that it became more durable and elastic, and didn't get quite as brittle.

Both the rubber tree and the morning glory were important plants to the Mayan people - the latter being a hallucinogen as well as a healing herb. They two plants tended to grow close together. Combining their juices, a black substance about the texture of a gum-type pencil eraser was formed. Native peoples in the region still make rubber in the same way. In several rolled sheets of rubber were sent to France where it fascinated those who saw it.

In , an Englishman named Samuel Peal discovered a means of waterproofing cloth by mixing rubber with turpentine. English inventor and scientist, Joseph Priestly, got his hands on some rubber and realized it could be used to erase pencil marks on sheets of paper. In , Charles Macintosh patented a method for making waterproof garments by using rubber dissolved in coal-tar naphtha for cementing two pieces of cloth together.

While he was trying to find uses for the waste products of gasworks, Macintosh discovered that coal-tar naphtha dissolved India rubber. He took wool cloth and painted one side with the dissolved rubber preparation and placed another layer of wool cloth on top.

In , Hancock finally patented the masticator, when Macintosh's waterproofing patent was being challenged. In the pre-Goodyear and pre-vulcanization age of rubber age, the masticated rubber that Hancock invented was used for pneumatic cushions, mattresses, pillows and bellows, hose, tubing, solid tires, shoes, packing and springs.

It was used everywhere. Hancock became the largest manufacturer of rubber goods in the world. The wooden masticator turned into a steam-driven metal machine, used to supple the Macintosh factory with masticated rubber.

Charles Goodyear, an American whose name graces the tires under millions of automobiles, is credited with the modern form of rubber. Before , rubber was subject to the conditions of the weather. If the weather was hot and sticky, so was the rubber. In cold weather it became brittle and hard.

Goodyear's recipe, a process known as vulcanization, was discovered when a mixture of rubber, lead and sulfur were accidentally dropped onto a hot stove. The result was a substance that wasn't affected by weather, and which would snap back to its original form if stretched. The process was refined and the uses for rubber materials increased as well.

This new rubber was resistant to water and chemical interactions and did not conduct electricity, so it was suited for a variety of products. The process of making the rubber product improved as time went by, and now various chemicals are added before the mix is poured into molds, heated and cured under pressure. Perry invented the rubber band to hold papers or envelopes together. At the present time Antoon Versteegde uses the same kind of rubber bands to fasten the bamboo poles in his transient constructions.

Latex a natural, stretchy substance from which rubber is made is extracted from rubber trees. Rubber trees are large trees belonging to the spurge family, family Euphorbiaceae that live in tropical warm areas. These trees are tapped for their latex, which is produced in their bark layers latex is not the sap. In , an Englishman named Sir Henry Wickham collected about seventy thousand rubber tree seeds from the Para rubber tree taken from the lower Amazon area of Brazil and brought them to London, England.

Seedlings were grown in London, and later sent to the East Indies, Ceylon and Singapore, where he started rubber plantations. The technique of tapping rubber trees for their latex was developed in Southeast Asia before that, the trees were cut down to extract the rubber. In an American named Chapman Mitchell learned to recycle used rubber into new products. Today about three quarters of the rubber in production is a synthetic product made from crude oil.

World War II cut the United States off from rubber supplies worldwide, and they stepped up production of synthetic rubber for use in the war effort. There are about 20 grades of synthetic rubber and the intended end use determines selection.

In general, to make synthetic rubber, byproducts of petroleum refining called butadiene and styrene are combined in a reactor containing soapsuds. A milky looking liquid latex results. The latex is coagulated from the liquid and results in rubber "crumbs" that are purchased by manufacturers and melted into numerous products.

There is only one kind of natural rubber. Indonesia's production has dropped in recent years and new plantations were started in Africa to take up the slack. The story of Bamboo. Thomas Hancock was an English inventor who founded the British rubber industry. He invented the masticator, a machine that shredded rubber scraps, allowing rubber to be recycled after being formed into blocks or rolled into sheets. In , Hancock patented elastic fastenings for gloves, suspenders, shoes and stockings.

In the process of creating the first elastic fabrics, Hancock found himself wasting considerable rubber. He invented the masticator to help conserve rubber. The first masticator was a wooden machine that used a hollow cylinder studded with teeth - inside the cylinder was a studded core that was hand cranked.

In , Hancock joined forces with the Scottish chemist and inventor of waterproof fabrics, Charles Macintosh. Together they produced Macintosh coats, or Mackintoshes, named after Charles Macintosh.

Share This Story. Inventors and Inventions: K. Filed to: design. However, a year-old Floridian named Joel Waul trumped them all. Guinness World Records , p.

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band. Enchanted Learning Search

They are commonly used for lashings, and can also be used for makeshift handle grips, providing a strong high-friction surface with excellent shock absorption. Identical loops of inner tube are used by cavers and cave divers , and in that context are called snoopy loops by the British caving and cave diving community. When they get lost they are recognizable as a common form of litter. Snoopy loops are easily cut from discarded car and motorcycle inner tubes using a pair of scissors.

A knife cut may leave a notched edge which can lead to tearing. Varying sizes of inner tube are used for different tasks. Uses in caving include sealing cuffs of oversuits and collars of boots against the ingress of water, holding kneepads and elbow pads in place or securing dive lines to small rocks. Technical divers use small snoopy loops made from bicycle inner tubes to prevent backup lights clipped to a dive harness from dangling, and larger loops cut from car tubes are used to stow hoses against sling or sidemount cylinders.

The exact origin is unknown and has been subject to much speculation. The practice was then propagated in Yorkshire Dales. It was considered a ridiculous name at the time. In animal husbandry , rubber bands are used for docking and castration of livestock. The procedure involves banding the body part with a tight latex rubber band to restrict blood flow.

As the blood flow diminishes, the cells within the gonads die and dehydrate. The part eventually drops off. Rubber bands have long been one of the methods of powering small free-flight model aircraft , the rubber band being anchored at the rear of the fuselage and connected to the propeller at the front.

To 'wind up' the 'engine', the propeller is repeatedly turned, twisting the rubber band. When the propeller has had enough turns, the propeller is released and the model launched, the rubber band then turning the propeller rapidly until it has unwound.

One of the first to use this method was pioneer aerodynamicist George Cayley , who used rubber band-driven motors for powering his small experimental models. These 'rubber motors' have also been used for powering small model boats. A rubber band ball is a sphere of rubber bands made by using a knotted single band as a starting point and then wrapping rubber bands around the center until the desired size is achieved. The world's largest rubber band ball as of November 19, was created by Joel Waul of Lauderhill, Florida.

It set the world record on November 13, , in Lauderhill, Florida with rubber bands contributed by Stretchwell. Steve Milton of Eugene, Oregon previously held the record for the biggest rubber band ball beginning in During the construction of his rubber band ball, he was sponsored by OfficeMax , who sent him rubber bands to use for his ball. He began building the ball, with help from his family, in November, and would store the ball in their garage.

He put the ball up for auction in , [32] but he and his ball participated in Guinness World Records Day The bands were donated by two companies: Alliance Rubber and Textrip Ltd. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Short circular elastic length of rubber and latex, commonly used to hold objects together. This article is about the common household item. For other uses, see Rubber band disambiguation.

For the band and orchestra, see The Elastic Band. For the first aid bandage, see Elastic bandage. This article needs additional citations for verification.

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. The examples and perspective in this section may not represent a worldwide view of the subject. You may improve this section , discuss the issue on the talk page , or create a new article , as appropriate. June Learn how and when to remove this template message. Main article: Rubber elasticity.

Main article: Royal Mail rubber band. Main article: Elastration. Archived from the original on This reference states that the rubber is vulcanized before it is extruded. The rubber is then cured on mandrels. Contradicting other sources, both credit Thomas Perry rather than Stephen Perry for the invention of the rubber band. Retrieved Archived at the Wayback Machine This reference states that the rubber is vulcanized after it is extruded.

Archived from the original on 7 November Retrieved 30 October Bristol exploration Club. Beyond the Blue. Archived from the original on April 26, Accessed: November 18, Guinness World Records , p.

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Categories: Diving medicine Commons: Category:Diving medicine. Thomas Hancock [21 November] and we mention these circumstances in order to give the best information to the manufacturer, and to state that we make no claim to the preparation of the india rubber herein mentioned, our invention consisting of springs of such preparation of india rubber applied to the articles herein mentioned, and also of the peculiar forms of elastic bands made from such manufacture of india rubber.

In making bands, whether for girths, belts, or bandages, with leather or woven fabric, requiring elasticity, the strips of the prepared india rubber herein mentioned may be incorporated in the fabric, or be the means of connecting separate parts of girths, belts, and bandages.

The construction of girths, belts, and bandages, being very numerous, though not materially differing from each other 60 far as their requirement for springs or elasticity, it will not be necessary to show every arrangement of belt, girth, or bandage which may have springs applied to them according to our invention, but it will be sufficient to show different means of applying the springs to some classes; and then the person making up other forms of belts or bandages than are shown, will readily apply the springs of the prepared india rubber thereto, according to this part of our invention, which consists of applying such springs to girths, belts, or bandages, made of woven or other fabric, or leather, and not in the form of the girths, belts, or bandages.

In like manner bands to form parts of braces, garters, and other articles, are made, having the springs, a , a , incorporated in the bands, or used as connecting means between parts thereof, as shown at figs. And in this manner may elasticity be given to girths, belts, and bandages made of woven or other fabrics, or leather, notwithstanding they may differ in shape from those shown in the drawing. The second part of our invention consists of manufacturing elastic bands by forming them endless, either in circles or cylinders, or other figure producing an endless band, which are applicable to various uses.

They may be covered with leather, silk, or other fabric, and used as garters or wristbands; also for going over other bandages to retain them in their places, in place of using bands of tape, or other such means of fastening; and they will be peculiarly applicable for retaining the paper or other coverings of jars containing preserves, Of other articles; and, in fact, for a great variety of purposes.

And we would state, that this part of our invention has for its object the making of endless bands of the prepared india rubber, applicable for various purposes. Having thus described the nature of our invention, and the manner in which the same is to be performed, we would have it understood, that we do not confine ourselves to the details herein described, so long as the peculiar character of either part of our invention be retained. But what we claim is,.

Secondly, we claim the making of endless elastic bands of the preparation of india rubber, applicable to various purposes, by cutting them from sheets or tubular forms of that manufacture. See also: 17 March - short biography, births, deaths and events on date of Perry's British patent. Nature bears long with those who wrong her. She is patient under abuse.

But when abuse has gone too far, when the time of reckoning finally comes, she is equally slow to be appeased and to turn away her wrath. Carl Sagan : In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again.

“Holding your world together”: a brief history of the rubber band -- K Trade Fair

Because Hancock invested so much energy and time in the controversy with Goodyear that he failed to secure other rights for himself. In , he had obtained his first rubber patent, which enabled him to incorporate fine rubber threads in textile fabrics and thus to produce the predecessors of our present-day stretch fabrics. A process that, incidentally, goes back to Johann Nepomuk Reithoffer , the master tailor from Moravia. He bought the raw rubber he needed for this purpose in Brazil: big lumps, in the processing of which considerable amounts were left over that were no longer any use for the production of threads of sufficient length.

In order to enable the left-over rubber to be put to a different use, Hancock shredded it in an enclosed, crank-driven, hollow cylinder — and was surprised, when he opened it, to find a single, hot ball of rubber instead of the small strips he had expected.

As can be explained from what we know today, the shredding operation had shortened the long molecule chain of the rubber particles — a process that takes place with the generation of a large amount of heat and increases the plastic properties of the rubber, so that it was now much easier to shape and process, as Hancock found out.

Hancock gradually increased its capacity to 90 kilograms and processed the masticated rubber into a wide variety of different products at his facility. He started to manufacture rubber tubing and piping as early as It was not long until he had the idea of cutting them into bands and rings. Hancock was, however, unable to think of any practical use for them, particularly in view of the fact that vulcanisation was still unknown and the rubber therefore remained an extremely inconsistent material — in spite of mastication — which became hard and brittle on cold days and became very soft on warm days.

So it is no surprise that Hancock did not try to market his rubber bands. What is surprising, however, is that he was not foresighted enough to secure the rights to them for the future, in the same way that he also failed to do so with the masticator — probably for secrecy reasons. In , Stephen Perry closed this gap with his patent application about elastic bands — with the crucial difference that they were in the meantime made from vulcanised rubber.

So Perry, who died in , really does deserve the credit for being the inventor of the rubber band, even if he — ironically enough — had obtained the material licence from Hancock.

As is generally known now, it is vulcanisation — i. What is behind this is a chemical crosslinking reaction: the linear polyisoprene chains of the natural rubber are crosslinked with each other by the addition of bridge-building sulphur, encouraged by high temperature and pressure. In order to make them particularly stretchy, most rubber bands are, incidentally, still manufactured from natural rubber, although synthetically produced rubber has been available for a long time now too, synthesised from, for example, butadiene and sodium.

It is standard procedure for rubber rings for preserved food jars to be made from vulcanised natural rubber too, so that they have tensile and tear strength properties and remain elastic for many years.

The sealing of glass containers containing preserved food was invented by Rudolf Rempel , a chemist from Gelsenkirchen in Germany. January More than million rubber rings for this purpose are now sold in Germany every year. Rubber factories that manufacture them frequently produce rubber rings for bottles too, that are used to seal flip-top closures to the tops of beer and mineral water bottles. The company reports that it manufactured rubber bands with a total weight of 6.

The figure was considerably higher in at Home Home. Discover K K Live. Fair Profile K Social Wall. Overview News. K Social Media. Topic of the Month.

Product Categories. Extended Exhibitor Search. Interactive hall plan. Exhibitor Index A-Z. Exhibitors by country. Information for visitors. Topics at K Cooperating Media. Overview for exhibitors. Become an exhibitor Online registration. Dashboard Dashboard home Activityboard. International Representatives. Apropos K. A brief history of the rubber band. March , the London industrialist Stephen Perry was granted the patent for the production of elastic bands from vulcanised natural rubber.

Since then, he has been considered the inventor of the rubber band, although he benefitted from the work done previously by one of his compatriots. The English-speaking world still continues to dominate the headlines where rubber bands are concerned: the biggest manufacturer in the world is based in the USA. And a world record associated with rubber bands was also set in the country where opportunities are said to be unlimited. They are used to keep bank notes, letters and newspapers together, to make bunches of herbs, to braid hair into pigtails or to tie it into ponytails.

They stop underwear slipping down, make sure that jars of preserved food are given an air-tight seal and have recently found a new application as the mounting for hard drives in computer housings: rubber bands of varying length and thickness, with the basic shape of an uninterrupted ring, hold everyday things together reliably. Their versatility and ubiquity mean that they are taken for granted almost as much as natural objects that are simply there without anyone having to invent or make them.

One of the reasons for this is that rubber bands have been in common use for many generations now and it is already almost years since the patent for producing them was granted. The initial patent holder was the London industrialist Stephen Perry, together with the engineer Thomas Barnabas Daft , who also worked in London. The British patent no. March that was granted to the two of them related to improvements to rubber bands for straps, belts and bandages as well as to the production of elastic bands.

Very simply: by slicing hollow rubber tubing into narrow strips. In the beginning they were still anything but a mass product and were used almost exclusively to hold loose sheets of paper, newspapers and other paper products together. Perry has been forgotten almost completely in the meantime and has been overshadowed by such more well-known contemporaries as Charles Nelson Goodyear and Thomas Hancock , the discoverers of the vulcanisation of rubber, or Charles Macintosh , the manufacturer of the first impermeable raincoat that was impregnated with rubber.

So who was this Stephen Perry, about whom no biography has been written to this day and of whom no photos can be found — even in the World Wide Web? He was, first of all, the son of James Perry, who in founded a company in Manchester that specialised in the production of steel pens.

When James Perry died in , his son Stephen took over management of the company and expanded the operations to include rubber bands after he received the above-mentioned patent. Perry and Co.

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band

Stephen perry inventor of rubber band