Pregnant in the veterinary field-Pregnant Veterinary Staff? Follow These HR Rules - Veterinary Practice News

This sheet talks about some of the general exposures present in veterinary work settings and outlines some resources available to help create a safe work environment. This information should not take the place of medical care and advice from your health care provider. Veterinary staff work in a variety of settings and each person will likely have different concerns regarding their specific workplace exposures. Remember, just because you work around these potential hazards, it does not mean you actually have levels of exposure that would cause a problem. In addition, there are safety measures that all workers can take to limit exposures.

Pregnant in the veterinary field

Does this mean that I am exposed to radiation? She worked full time before the birth of her first son in August Prevnant took 12 weeks of maternity leave. Typically the only reason a practice would not have to provide an accommodation is if by providing the accommodation the business would suffer undue hardship. At press time, her due date was Jan. She became an associate at a small animal practice in Delaware and later in North Carolina.

Nerinx tracy johnson. Large animal practitioner takes difficult pregnancies in stride

We only use passive scavenger systems sodasorb. Check to make sure that you are using the correct type of gloves and other personal protective equipment. Animal Health SmartBrief. Pregnancy can be a very exciting but also very physically straining time in your life. She moved closer to work at about five months pregnant. In addition, pregnant women will be adjusting to a shifted center of gravity. Louis, Missouri, and is board-certified in both Pediatrics and Medical Pregnang. The most-frequently reported injuries are animal bites and scratches received while fiwld animals. This information should not take the place of medical care and fiel Pregnant in the veterinary field your health care provider. Her mom, Kathy Dawson, accompanied them in the truck. Sign In Create Account. Can this harm my pregnancy? She Oscar tits working a week before having her first son in Novemberand she took eight weeks off after the delivery.

Jul 15, Human Resources.

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  • Practicing while pregnant is not as difficult as practicing while raising young children, according to many veterinarians who have done both recently.
  • While there are precautions that apply to most jobs regarding pregnancy in the workplace, being a vet in practice presents some rather specific risks.
  • This sheet talks about some of the general exposures present in veterinary work settings and outlines some resources available to help create a safe work environment.

This sheet talks about some of the general exposures present in veterinary work settings and outlines some resources available to help create a safe work environment. This information should not take the place of medical care and advice from your health care provider.

Veterinary staff work in a variety of settings and each person will likely have different concerns regarding their specific workplace exposures.

Remember, just because you work around these potential hazards, it does not mean you actually have levels of exposure that would cause a problem. In addition, there are safety measures that all workers can take to limit exposures. It is unlikely. Older studies, which were mostly done before the use of modern scavenging equipment devices that collect anesthesia from the air to avoid inhalation by veterinary staff , suggested that repeated exposure or high levels of exposure to inhaled anesthetics in an occupational setting might increase the chance for a birth defect or miscarriage.

However, occupational exposure to inhaled anesthetics with the use of scavenging equipment and correct technique does not lead to a higher chance of miscarriage or birth defects. Anesthetics can be given through injection, IV infusion, intubation, or mask inhalation.

For each person, the risk of exposure to inhaled anesthesia will depend on the specific drugs used, how they are given, and the protective measures that are in place. Workers often face their highest chance of exposure during induction and recovery and when filling the vaporizer. Air monitoring can be done to evaluate staff exposure. I am around our x-ray machine. Does this mean that I am exposed to radiation? In veterinary work settings, ionizing radiation could also occur with use of radioactive isotopes and radiation therapy machines for example, assisting in fluoroscopy procedures and I treatments for hyperthyroid animals.

There are some medications that are considered unsafe to directly handle while pregnant without taking proper precautions. Workers could be exposed to hazardous drugs while handling them during: reconstitution, transfer between containers, spiking and unspiking IV containers, priming IV tubing, connecting or disconnecting syringes from injection ports, disposal and with equipment maintenance.

Handling bodily fluids of treated animals e. Exposure can also occur when stocking and storing hazardous drugs as surface contamination studies have shown that areas where the drugs were stored and handled were often contaminated.

Infertility, loss of pregnancy, birth defects, and poor fetal growth have been reported with handling exposure for some medications. However, most of these studies were among nurses who spent a lot of time around hazardous drugs. All employees handling medications should have training that covers all steps including opening, handling, administering, storing and disposal. If you handle hazardous drugs, wear protective gear. When you are finished handling the drugs, clean the preparation area and wash your hands.

Do not eat or drink in the area where these drugs are prepared or administered or when wearing contaminated gloves or other protective clothing. Are there zoonotic or parasitic diseases that I should be concerned about? A zoonotic disease is a disease that can be passed between animals and humans. Zoonotic diseases can be caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi. Exposure can occur when humans come into contact with the saliva, blood, urine, or feces of an infected animal, or when bitten by a tick or mosquito.

When you are pregnant your body has a harder time fighting infections and you have a greater chance of developing serious complications from diseases. If you are pregnant and think you have contracted a disease, illness, or parasite contact your health care provider.

There are others. Pregnant Vets and Vet techs who are responsible for dealing with bodily fluids from the animals, such as cleaning cages and litter boxes, or feces from an infected animal, can consider passing this responsibility to another co-worker.

However, all staff members should wear proper protective equipment such as thick disposable gloves, protective clothing, and a mask while handling these animals and their samples regardless if they are pregnant or not.

Proper hand washing is critical. In addition, make sure you are up to date on all of your immunizations. How can I learn more about the pesticides and cleaning chemicals with which I work? Vet workers are required to use cleaning chemicals to sterilize equipment and rooms, and could be around pesticides.

These sheets will describe the proper way to use, store, and dispose of these chemicals. With proper workplace practices and precautions, most of these products can be safely used. Check to make sure that you are using the correct type of gloves and other personal protective equipment. An industrial hygienist can help make sure your worksite has the correct protections in place.

Vet workers have a physically demanding job that involves lifting and restraining animals and long periods of standing and long work hours. Ligaments the tissue that connect bones start to loosen throughout pregnancy, which makes them more prone to injury. In addition, pregnant women will be adjusting to a shifted center of gravity.

This can make balancing more difficult. Some but not all studies have suggested that prolonged standing during pregnancy is associated with preterm labor or low birth weight. Pregnant women should avoid strenuous lifting, especially in the third trimester. On average, 25 pounds is the limit for a healthy pregnant woman when it comes to lifting.

However, you should discuss your personal limits with your health care provider. The risk of heavy lifting and strain is for the mother, not the baby. Consider asking for assistance when you need to lift or help restrain animals. If your job requires you to be on your feet for long periods of time, take regular short breaks of about minutes every 2 hours.

Your worksite should provide MSDS on all chemicals and also proper personal protection for all parts of your job. Be certain to use them, even when not pregnant. Proper hand washing is one of the most important steps you can take. Wash hands before and after each patient and after contact with any bodily substance or articles contaminated by them. Wash hands before eating or drinking; after cleaning animal cages or animal-care areas; after handling chemicals; and whenever hands are visibly soiled.

The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians NASPHV created a Model Infection Control Plan for Veterinary Practices that outlines hand washing, use of gloves, sleeves, facial protection, and protective outerwear, along with animal-related injury prevention, protective actions to use during veterinary procedures, and environmental controls. If you have specific concerns regarding your work site discuss them with your health care provider or call MotherToBaby with your specific questions.

Besides an emphasis on medication use, Dr. In the last few weeks, MotherToBaby, a service of the Organization of …. Help us help women and their healthcare providers as they make treatment choices in pregnancy and while breastfeeding. You have questions. We have answers. Email An Expert. Fact Sheets. Working as a Veterinarian or Veterinary Technician during Pregnancy Wednesday, 01 November This sheet talks about some of the general exposures present in veterinary work settings and outlines some resources available to help create a safe work environment.

What types of hazards might be at my workplace? In general, potential hazards that Veterinarians Vets and Veterinary Technicians Vet Techs might face include: anesthesia and waste gases ionizing radiation medications animal-transmitted diseases and parasites pesticides and other chemicals accidents bites, falls, needle sticks infections from bites or scratches, methicillin-resistant staphylococci MRS allergic reactions heavy lifting and physical strain shift work Veterinary staff work in a variety of settings and each person will likely have different concerns regarding their specific workplace exposures.

I work around anesthetic agents. Can this harm my pregnancy? Can heavy lifting, strain or stress pose a risk for my pregnancy? How do I reduce job related exposures as a Vet or Vet Tech? Who can I contact for more information?

Health Professionals Fact Sheets F. View PDF Version. I am a mom to a healthy and happy nine month old baby. I had planned to stay on my SSRI during my pregnancy and felt confident about my decision until I encountered resistance from multiple providers before birth. The expert help I got from you during this time was critical and I am so glad I found you.

I wish that every healthcare professional a person might encounter before, during and after pregnancy was as educated, supportive and non-judgmental as your team. Meet An Expert. Miller, PhD. Connect With Us. E-News Sign Up. Contact Us.

References show hide. Your worksite should provide MSDS on all chemicals and also proper personal protection for all parts of your job. She did worry about the risks of the job, particularly when she was knocked around by animals. I work at a surgery only center so i can not completely elminate it. Just as with all employees, working parents are entitled to request a flexible working pattern in writing. How do I reduce job related exposures as a Vet or Vet Tech?

Pregnant in the veterinary field

Pregnant in the veterinary field

Pregnant in the veterinary field. Recent Veterinary Technician Jobs

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First, the news should be met with sincere warm wishes and congratulations and the team member reassured that the practice will work with her and do what it reasonably can to help her with the transition and reduce the workplace hazards to the fetus. Keep a written record of all meetings. Pregnant team members should inform their obstetrician regarding the risks inherent in a veterinary practice, which can include:. It is unlawful for managers to prohibit a team member from working in her usual capacity because she is pregnant.

She should consult her physician before deciding which duties she should or should not perform according to the responsibilities outlined in her job description. The team member can also be asked to sign a document acknowledging that:. Circumstances may change as her pregnancy progresses, such as the ability to lift or restrain patients. Managers should always encourage the team member to bring up any concerns and be prepared to make reasonable accommodations to her duties.

The team member should provide her leader with regular written recommendations from her doctor as to what she can and cannot do. If management can no longer accommodate her recommendations, she may need to take maternity leave earlier than planned. If the team member seeks to stay in her regular position, with or without reasonable and agreed-upon accommodations, she owes it to her manager to perform substantially all of the duties necessary to carry out her work.

A manager is under no obligation to create a new position for a pregnant team member; however, a request for a more administrative position should be accommodated if:. Pregnancy laws protect those team members from discrimination. If she is eligible for benefits, management may have to hold her position open for a specified period. Communication is key and team members should be:.

Author Information. For global readers, a calculator to convert laboratory values, dosages, and other measurements to SI units can be found here. Material from Clinician's Brief may not be reproduced, distributed, or used in whole or in part without prior permission of Educational Concepts, LLC. For questions or inquiries please contact us. Create Account. All Content. No results found. From to , Veterinary Team Brief delivered tools and solutions for the veterinary practice.

You are viewing content from the Veterinary Team Brief archive. Find more Veterinary Team Brief content here. Sign In. For each person, the risk of exposure to inhaled anesthesia will depend on the specific drugs used, how they are given, and the protective measures that are in place. Workers often face their highest chance of exposure during induction and recovery and when filling the vaporizer.

Air monitoring can be done to evaluate staff exposure. I am around our x-ray machine. Does this mean that I am exposed to radiation? In veterinary work settings, ionizing radiation could also occur with use of radioactive isotopes and radiation therapy machines for example, assisting in fluoroscopy procedures and I treatments for hyperthyroid animals. There are some medications that are considered unsafe to directly handle while pregnant without taking proper precautions.

Workers could be exposed to hazardous drugs while handling them during: reconstitution, transfer between containers, spiking and unspiking IV containers, priming IV tubing, connecting or disconnecting syringes from injection ports, disposal and with equipment maintenance.

Handling bodily fluids of treated animals e. Exposure can also occur when stocking and storing hazardous drugs as surface contamination studies have shown that areas where the drugs were stored and handled were often contaminated.

Infertility, loss of pregnancy, birth defects, and poor fetal growth have been reported with handling exposure for some medications. However, most of these studies were among nurses who spent a lot of time around hazardous drugs.

All employees handling medications should have training that covers all steps including opening, handling, administering, storing and disposal. If you handle hazardous drugs, wear protective gear. When you are finished handling the drugs, clean the preparation area and wash your hands. Do not eat or drink in the area where these drugs are prepared or administered or when wearing contaminated gloves or other protective clothing.

Are there zoonotic or parasitic diseases that I should be concerned about? A zoonotic disease is a disease that can be passed between animals and humans. Zoonotic diseases can be caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi.

Exposure can occur when humans come into contact with the saliva, blood, urine, or feces of an infected animal, or when bitten by a tick or mosquito. When you are pregnant your body has a harder time fighting infections and you have a greater chance of developing serious complications from diseases.

If you are pregnant and think you have contracted a disease, illness, or parasite contact your health care provider. There are others. Pregnant Vets and Vet techs who are responsible for dealing with bodily fluids from the animals, such as cleaning cages and litter boxes, or feces from an infected animal, can consider passing this responsibility to another co-worker. However, all staff members should wear proper protective equipment such as thick disposable gloves, protective clothing, and a mask while handling these animals and their samples regardless if they are pregnant or not.

Proper hand washing is critical. In addition, make sure you are up to date on all of your immunizations. How can I learn more about the pesticides and cleaning chemicals with which I work? Vet workers are required to use cleaning chemicals to sterilize equipment and rooms, and could be around pesticides. These sheets will describe the proper way to use, store, and dispose of these chemicals. With proper workplace practices and precautions, most of these products can be safely used.

Check to make sure that you are using the correct type of gloves and other personal protective equipment. An industrial hygienist can help make sure your worksite has the correct protections in place. Vet workers have a physically demanding job that involves lifting and restraining animals and long periods of standing and long work hours. Ligaments the tissue that connect bones start to loosen throughout pregnancy, which makes them more prone to injury.

In addition, pregnant women will be adjusting to a shifted center of gravity. This can make balancing more difficult. Some but not all studies have suggested that prolonged standing during pregnancy is associated with preterm labor or low birth weight. Pregnant women should avoid strenuous lifting, especially in the third trimester. On average, 25 pounds is the limit for a healthy pregnant woman when it comes to lifting. However, you should discuss your personal limits with your health care provider.

The risk of heavy lifting and strain is for the mother, not the baby.

Specific considerations for pregnant vets and their employers - Veterinary Woman

It can be tough to be pregnant in the veterinary world. There are a lot of expectations in our field to be constantly on our feet, lifting heavy dogs, handling unvaccinated animals, taking radiographs, etc. A meeting with your doctor can help you determine if there are any specific limitations for your personal health. Along with any individual restrictions, here are some things to keep in mind as you go about your day to day in the clinic. It is important to always to follow proper safety precautions when anesthetizing animals, but even more so when pregnant.

Exposure to waste anesthetic gases has been associated with an increased rate of spontaneous abortions and congenital abnormalities. There is a high risk of exposure to waste anesthetic gases during patient induction especially masking or chamber box and recovery. If possible, it would be ideal to hand these tasks off to another staff member to avoid risk of exposure.

In the likely event that this is not a possibility, the following safety precautions are important to remember. Taking x-rays during pregnancy puts a fetus at great risk as ionizing radiation is especially damaging to cells that are in stages of rapid change. Exposure to ionizing radiation can have severe effects ranging from stunted growth, birth defects, mental retardation, increase risk of cancer, and even fetal death depending on the time of exposure during development.

Exposure should be avoided completely if possible. If a pregnant woman must take an x-ray, she should protect herself completely as any other employee should, with use of protective shielding and monitoring badges.

Toxoplasma is commonly known zoonotic disease with most kitty litter bags carrying warnings about the potential risk to humans, as it can be transmitted through ingestion of oocytes found in cat feces. Toxoplasma can also be contracted most commonly through ingestion of undercooked meat, as well as poorly washed fruits and vegetables, and contact with contaminated soil. In cat feces, oocytes take 48 hours to become infective, so regular cleaning of a litter box while wearing gloves and washing hands can drastically reduce chances for transmission.

Other potential zoonotic risks include but are not limited to salmonella, leptospirosis, brucellosis, listeriosis, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis, Psittacosis, giardiasis, and Lymphocytic choriomeningitis.

Personal protective equipment and frequent hand washing are essential in reducing the risks of transmission. While no one wants to be seen as shying away from work, there are certain patients where contact should be avoided when possible.

As always, infectious patients and chemotherapy patients as well as their bodily fluids should be handled with the utmost care and use of personal protective equipment. Aggressive patients and patients who are not rabies vaccinated should be avoided in order to reduce the risk of scratch and bite wounds that would require antibiotic treatment, which could harm a developing fetus.

Bone cement is usually used more frequently in specialty and referral clinics, and during mixing it can produce very strong fumes. The FDA has stated that there may be adverse effects on bone growth and general fetal health with exposure to these fumes. Other noxious chemicals could be detrimental as well, so be sure to read MSDS sheets for products used within your clinic and whenever possible, avoid exposure.

There are certain medications where special handling is always of utmost importance and obviously even more so when pregnant. Reproductive drugs, hormones, immunosuppressant medications, pesticides, antibiotics chloramphenicol and cyclosporine , and chemotherapy drugs all require special handling and clean up. When possible, have another team member prepare and administer these medications and otherwise use chemotherapy gloves while handling medications to help reduce exposure risks.

Pregnancy can be a very exciting but also very physically straining time in your life. Take good care of yourself and ask for help from others when needed! Occupational safety and health administration: Anesthetic gases: Guidelines for Workplace Exposures.

Philadelphia, WB Saunders, Food and Drug Administration. Dubey JP. Toxoplasmosis in sheep, goats, pigs and cattle. Congenital toxoplasmosis: epidemiological features and control. Can Med Assoc J. McLain Madsen L. Pregnancy in the Workplace. Veterinary Technician. Home Company Articles Pregnancy while working in a veterinary clinic. Waste Anesthetic Gases It is important to always to follow proper safety precautions when anesthetizing animals, but even more so when pregnant.

Vapor respirators can be purchased and worn as an extra barrier. Leak test your machine before every procedure. Use a passive or active scavenger system.

Inflate the patients ET tube cuff prior to turning on gas anesthetics. Recover the patient with oxygen while hooked up to the anesthetic machine to allow for the exhalation of built up gases to be collected by the scavenge. Avoid masking or boxing down patients atall costs — if absolutely necessary, ensure a good seal on the box or use the proper sized mask for the patient.

High Risk Patients While no one wants to be seen as shying away from work, there are certain patients where contact should be avoided when possible. Handling Medications There are certain medications where special handling is always of utmost importance and obviously even more so when pregnant. References Occupational safety and health administration: Anesthetic gases: Guidelines for Workplace Exposures. Go to Top.

Pregnant in the veterinary field

Pregnant in the veterinary field