Multiload sexual-Copper intrauterine devices (IUDs) - Long-acting Reversible Contraception - NCBI Bookshelf

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you decide to have Multiload Radiopaque inserted. This leaflet provides information that may help you in your decision to start using Multiload. It will also advise you how to use Multiload properly and safely. Keep this leaflet and read it also regularly while using Multiload, since it is important to stay alert on matters that do not affect you now, but may affect you in the future. If you have further questions, please ask your doctor, professional health care provider or pharmacist.

Multiload sexual

Multiload sexual

Multiload sexual

Multiload sexual

Multiload sexual

If necessary, remind your doctor of the need of replacement. Ask your doctor when Multiload should be replaced. Perforation of the uterus is a serious but uncommon complication of IUD insertion. There were significant differences in discontinuation rates due to amenorrhoea With Multiload-cu this is usually done after 3 years; with Multiload-cu after 5 years. Disadvantages It doesn't protect against sexually transmissible infections STIs It requires Multiload sexual procedure to be put in and removed from the uterus; putting it in can be uncomfortable When the IUD is put in Multiload sexual is a small chance of: difficulty inserting the IUD damage to the wall of the uterus perforation infection It can sometimes come out by itself Your periods can be heavier and last longer You can have some irregular spot bleeding in the first few months How do I get a Icing recipie using heavy whipping cream IUD? At the top and on both sides of the uterus are the fallopian tubes a with ovaries b beneath them. Clear Turn Off Turn On. Good studies find no increased risk of infertility among women who have used IUDs, including young women and women with no children. The chances of getting an infection are greater if Multiload sexual or your partner have other sexual partners.

Christy carelson romano in the nude. 1. WHAT IS MULTILOAD RADIOPAQUE AND WHAT IS IT USED FOR

If the egg is fertilised, it travels from the fallopian tube to the uterus. Multiload sexual works as soon as it is fitted. The page you're trying to access: is not part of Pornhub. At the top and on both sides of the uterus are the fallopian tubes a with ovaries b beneath them. It depends on how long you want to Multoload Multiload, and the size of your womb. Create a new Playlist. Private corrections dare with me? Pode me ajudar? You should be counselled by your doctor on all aspects of Multiload including those concerning your Multiload sexual and future fertility. Pregnancy Women fitted with an IUD still have a very slight chance of pregnancy.

Some couples do not want to use the IUD because they incorrectly believe that the IUD prevents pregnancy by causing abortions.

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  • Read all of this leaflet carefully before you decide to have Multiload Radiopaque inserted.
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  • This hormone causes changes in your cervical mucus and uterine lining, making it harder for sperm to reach the uterus and harder for a fertilized egg to attach to the uterus.
  • Birth control is an issue which at one time or another you share with many women all over the world.
  • .

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you decide to have Multiload Radiopaque inserted. This leaflet provides information that may help you in your decision to start using Multiload. It will also advise you how to use Multiload properly and safely. Keep this leaflet and read it also regularly while using Multiload, since it is important to stay alert on matters that do not affect you now, but may affect you in the future.

If you have further questions, please ask your doctor, professional health care provider or pharmacist. It is a small plastic rod, called stem, with two small flexible side-arms.

A copper wire is wound around the stem. A nylon thread with two ends is attached to the bottom end of the stem Figure 1. Three different Multiloads are available. Your doctor will decide which one suits you best. It depends on how long you want to use Multiload, and the size of your womb.

Multiload-cu has a copper wire with a surface of square millimeters. It works for three years. Multiload-cu has a thicker copper wire, with a surface of square millimeters. It works for five years. The Multiload-cu comes in a standard length; the Multiload-cu comes in a standard and short length, to suit the size of your womb. Multiload is an IUD. IUD stands for 'intra-uterine contraceptive device': an object in the womb.

An IUD does not guarantee absolute protection against pregnancy, but it is very effective. It works as soon as it is fitted. The womb is a pear-shaped, muscular organ, slightly smaller than your fist. The womb is joined to the cervix d , and the vagina e. The fallopian tubes a extend from both sides of the upper part of the womb to the ovaries b. Together the ovaries, fallopian tubes, womb and vagina form the female sex organs. They are not functional until puberty.

Figure 3 When a woman starts having periods menstruating she is sexually mature. Around every four weeks a tiny egg cell which is smaller than this.

This egg cell a travels through the fallopian tube where it may be fertilized by a male seed cell sperm, b in Figure 3. While the egg cell travels through the fallopian tube, the womb prepares to receive a fertilized egg.

At about the time when an egg cell is ready to be fertilized, this membrane - the endometrium - becomes twice as thick as normal, and tiny blood vessels supply it with an extra quantity of blood. If the egg cell is not fertilized, a part of the endometrium is shed after fourteen days, together with a quantity of blood: menstruation d takes place.

If the egg is fertilized, it travels from the fallopian tube into the womb. Here, it attaches to the mucous membrane e , usually high up in the womb. If this happens, the mucous membrane is not shed and: no menstruation takes place. An age old method rediscovered For more than years it has been known that pregnancy can be prevented by inserting objects into the womb, such as a pebble, a ring or a wire.

Doctors have developed a modern and reliable way of contraception based on this age-old method. An important discovery was that the reliability of IUDs is greatly improved by adding copper. How an IUD prevents pregnancy is not exactly known yet, but it is generally believed that an IUD prevents the sperm meeting and fertilizing an egg cell as well as implantation of the fertilized egg cell. Your doctor will take a thorough look at your medical records to find out if there is any reason why you should not use an IUD.

In addition, you must tell your doctor all about your state of health. You should be informed by your doctor on all aspects of Multiload including those concerning your health and future fertility.

Contact your doctor about any changes in your state of health, which you think may be due to the use of Multiload. Some medicines may prevent Multiload from working properly. This can lead to decrease in contraceptive efficacy.

This is the case for medicines that suppress the immune system for instance given to prevent rejection of a graft after transplantation , corticosteroids, and 'nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs' NSAIDs including painkillers such as aspirin. If you need long-lasting intensive treatment with any of these medicines, another method of contraception might be more appropriate. If you have to undergo intensive treatment with any of these medicines on occasion, during these periods you should take additional protective measures for example by using a condom.

Always tell your doctor or dentist who prescribes another medicine that you use Multiload. When you have microwave, shortwave or diathermy treatment of the lower abdomen or back, inform your physio therapist that you use a copper-bearing IUD. Multiload does not impair the scan obtained with MRI.

Multiload may be used while you are breast feeding. However, as there may be an increased risk that Multiload may pass the uterine wall during breast feeding, particular care should be taken. Therefore, if you wish to use Multiload while breastfeeding, please seek the advice of your doctor. Even when using an IUD, there is still a very slight chance that you become pregnant. If this happens, pregnancy could lead to serious complications. So you should contact your doctor if your period is two weeks or more late.

The IUD should be removed as soon as pregnancy is established. Sometimes, removing the IUD leads to a miscarriage. If you insist on continuing the pregnancy without removal of the IUD, you ought to be referred to a gynaecologist. This is because such a pregnancy requires a good medical support.

You must tell your doctor immediately if you have complaints such as flu, fever, cramping or pain in your tummy, pain during intercourse and vaginal bleeding or discharge. If you do get pregnant with the IUD in place, there is a chance of having an extra-uterine pregnancy a fertilized egg not implanting in the womb, but for instance in a fallopian tube.

Although a copper loaded IUD protects also against extra-uterine ectopic pregnancies, it protects better against a normal pregnancy. An extra-uterine pregnancy is a serious condition, which needs urgent medical attention. Multiload has to be inserted by a doctor. After examining your womb to determine its position, size and condition, an instrument called 'speculum' is inserted into your vagina as for a smear test and the cervix and vagina are cleaned with antiseptic lotion.

Your doctor uses a thin plastic tube to insert Multiload into your womb. After insertion of Multiload, the two threads reach into the top of the vagina see Figures 4 and 5 so that you can check if Multiload is still in place. Your doctor will show you how to do this. Neither you nor your partner should feel Multiload during intercourse. If you do, tell your doctor. Sometimes an IUD is pushed out of the womb into the vagina 'expulsion'. Your womb remains slightly open during your menstrual period, so the chance of expulsion is somewhat higher during these days.

Always check your sanitary towel or tampon before disposing of it. Menstrual tampons can be freely used. Make sure after each period and at any time you have an unusual pain in your abdomen during your period, that you do feel the threads deep down in the vagina, and that you do not feel the rod sticking out of the cervix. Always wash your hands carefully before and after this examination.

If you do not feel the threads, or if you do feel the firm part of Multiload, you should contact your doctor. Until you have been examined, use an additional form of contraception such as a condom. Ask your doctor when Multiload should be replaced. With Multiload-cu this is usually done after 3 years; with Multiload-cu after 5 years.

If necessary, remind your doctor of the need of replacement. To help you remember when Multiload was inserted, and when Multiload must be removed at the latest, your doctor will give you a User Card that shows these data.

Keep this card carefully. This card is also important in case you want to report any complaints about Multiload. Soon after Multiload has been fitted, you may have lower abdominal pain or cramps, but these usually get better quickly. If you have serious or persistent abdominal complaints or heavy bleeding you must tell your doctor. Your first, and sometimes your second menstruation may come slightly earlier than expected. These periods may last longer and be a bit more painful than usual.

In the beginning some bleeding may occur between menstrual periods. This is nothing to worry about, but mention it to your doctor during your next visit. Occasionally complaints are reported, such as; pain in the back or legs, pain during intercourse, or itching eruptions of the skin as a result of an allergic reaction.

If you notice such signs, contact your doctor immediately. During the first weeks to months after insertion of an IUD, there is a slightly higher chance of infection of the womb and the fallopian tubes pelvic inflammatory disease, PID.

The chances of getting an infection are greater if you or your partner have other sexual partners. Having PID can seriously affect your fertility in the future. An infection should be treated until it is completely cured. Sometimes the IUD has to be removed to ensure complete healing of the infection. There have been occasional reports of the thread breaking when removing Multiload.

To ensure complete healing it may sometimes be necessary that the IUD is removed. Some medicines may prevent Multiload from working properly. In order to maintain the high quality of this product the manufacturer is very interested in all your complaints or remarks with respect to Multiload. To view the video, this page requires javascript to be enabled. Multiload has to be inserted by a doctor. They may prevent fertilisation by their action on the fallopian tube; alternatively should an egg be fertilised they may prevent implantation in the uterus.

Multiload sexual

Multiload sexual

Multiload sexual

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Intra-Uterine Device (IUD) - SHINE SA

Some couples do not want to use the IUD because they incorrectly believe that the IUD prevents pregnancy by causing abortions. In the vast majority of cases, IUDs work by preventing fertilization. The copper-bearing IUD acts as a spermicide, killing or impairing sperm so they cannot reach the egg. IUDs that contain progestin cause the cervical mucus to thicken, which stops sperm from entering the uterus.

Thus, the current evidence suggests that the main mechanisms of action of IUDs occur prior to fertilization. In very rare case, IUDs prevent implantation which is considered a contraceptive not an abortifacient effect. Some women do not want to use the IUD because they incorrectly believe that the IUD is not effective in preventing pregnancy or that the IUD loses its contraceptive effect after only a few years from the time of insertion.

Both the hormonal and copper-bearing IUDs are highly effective contraceptive methods. In fact, they are among the most effective reversible methods, with pregnancy rates similar to those for female sterilization. A small risk of pregnancy remains beyond the first year of use and continues as long as the woman is using the LNG-IUD. A small risk of pregnancy remains beyond the first year of use and continues as long as the woman is using the IUD. Over 10 years of IUD use, about 2 per women will become pregnant.

The IUD is effective for up to 12 years. Some women do not want to use the IUD because they incorrectly believe that IUD causes side effects or health risks such as cancer, sexually transmitted infections, or birth defects. Infection related to IUD insertion probably occurs because the instruments or IUD carry with them organisms from the lower genital tract. If the organisms are bacteria normally present in the genital tract, then it seems that some mechanism automatically eliminates this contamination from the uterus soon after the insertion process without infection occurring.

The IUD never travels to the heart, brain, or any other part of the body outside the abdomen. The IUD normally stays within the uterus like a seed within a shell. Rarely, the IUD may come through perforate the wall of the uterus into the abdominal cavity.

This is most often due to a mistake during insertion. Proper insertion technique can help prevent many problems, such as infection, expulsion, and perforation. If uterine perforation is suspected within 6 weeks after insertion or if it is suspected later and is causing symptoms, refer the client for evaluation to a clinician experienced at removing such IUDs. Usually, however, the out-of-place IUD causes no problems and should be left where it is. The woman will need another contraceptive method.

IUDs do not cause cancer in otherwise healthy women, but confirmed or suspected cancer of the genital tract is a contraindication to IUD use, because the increased risk of infection, perforation, and bleeding at insertion may make the condition worse.

For the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD, breast cancer is also a contraindication. However, usually women who have a very high risk of exposure to gonorrhea or chlamydia should not have an IUD inserted. IUD use neither causes multiple pregnancies after removal nor increases the risk of birth defects, whether the pregnancy occurs with the IUD in place, or after removal. In the rare event that a client becomes pregnant with an IUD in situ, it is important to explain the risks of leaving the IUD in the uterus during pregnancy.

There is a higher risk of preterm delivery or miscarriage, including infected septic miscarriage during the first or second trimester, which can be life-threatening. Early removal of the IUD reduces these risks, although the removal procedure itself involves a small risk of miscarriage. There is no evidence of increased risk of fetal malformations, however.

A woman with chlamydia or gonorrhea at the time of IUD insertion, however, is at higher risk of PID in the first few weeks after insertion than she is later. To reduce the risk of infection during IUD insertion, providers can ensure appropriate insertion conditions, screening, and counseling, as well as regularly monitor and treat infection. Antibiotics are usually not routinely given before IUD insertion.

When appropriate questions to screen for STI risk are asked and IUD insertion is done with proper infection-prevention procedures including the no-touch insertion technique , there is little risk of infection. There is no need to remove the IUD if a woman wants to continue using it. If a woman wants it removed, it can be taken out after starting antibiotic treatment. It may be inserted as soon as she finishes treatment, if she is not at risk for reinfection before insertion.

The copper in copper-bearing IUDs is not released into the blood. Levels of serum copper in long-term users of copper IUDs are similar to that of the normal population. Some couples do not want to use the IUD because they incorrectly believe that the IUD will cause infertility, ectopic pregnancy, or miscarriage.

Good studies find no increased risk of infertility among women who have used IUDs, including young women and women with no children. Whether or not a woman has an IUD, however, if she develops pelvic inflammatory disease PID and it is not treated, there is some chance that she will become infertile.

PID can permanently damage the lining of the fallopian tubes and may partially or totally block one or both tubes enough to cause infertility.

In the unlikely event of pregnancy in an IUD user, 6 to 8 in every of these pregnancies is ectopic. Thus, the great majority of pregnancies after IUD failure are not ectopic. Still, ectopic pregnancy can be life-threatening, so a provider should be aware that ectopic pregnancy is possible if an IUD fails. IUDs do not cause miscarriages after they have been removed.

If correct insertion technique is used, the use of an IUD will not cause any difficulty in future pregnancies. There is a higher risk of preterm delivery or first- and second- trimester miscarriage, including infected septic miscarriage which can be life-threatening.

If the client does not want to continue the pregnancy and if therapeutic termination of pregnancy is legally available, inform her accordingly. If she wishes to continue the pregnancy and the IUD strings are visible or can be retrieved safely from the cervical canal, gently remove the IUD or refer for removal.

The client should return at once if she develops any signs of miscarriage or septic miscarriage vaginal bleeding, cramping, pain, abnormal vaginal discharge, or fever. However, if the IUD strings cannot be found in the cervical canal and the IUD cannot be safely retrieved, refer for ultrasound, if possible, to determine whether the IUD is still in the uterus.

If the IUD is still in the uterus, if ultrasound is not available, or if the client chooses to keep the IUD, her pregnancy should be followed closely by a nurse or doctor. She should see a nurse or doctor at once if she develops any signs of septic miscarriage. Many couples do not want to use the IUD because they incorrectly believe that using the IUD will cause either no monthly bleeding amenorrhea or heavier, painful, and more frequent menstrual bleeding, and this is harmful for your system.

These bleeding changes are normal and usually are not signs of illness. They are most common in the first 3 to 6 months after insertion and usually lessen with time. A provider should evaluate for an underlying condition unrelated to method use if:.

Severe anaemia requires careful consideration because if heavier menstrual periods are experienced, the additional monthly blood loss could worsen existing anaemia. The anaemia should be treated before an IUD is inserted. Women using the LNG-IUD may experience heavy, prolonged, or irregular bleeding in the first few months, but then experience:.

Copper-bearing IUDs rarely cause monthly bleeding to stop completely. However, women using an LNG-IUD may not experience monthly bleeding due to strong uniform suppression of the endometrium. If monthly bleeding does not occur while a woman is using a copper-bearing IUD, pregnancy should be excluded. If the woman is not pregnant, other causes of no monthly bleeding should be investigated. Pain associated with menstruation may increase in some women, but usually this is only for the first month or two.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may also reduce discomfort. Some couples do not want to use the IUD because they incorrectly believe that the IUD will cause inconvenience during sex, pain for the male partner because the strings will hurt the penis, or that using the IUD causes discomfort and pain for the woman during sex. Fact: It might make you more relaxed about unintended pregnancies and enjoy sex even more!

There is no reason why an IUD should negatively affect sexual pleasure. On the contrary, being free from fear of pregnancy may allow both partners, especially the woman, to enjoy their sexual life.

There is no reason why an IUD should cause discomfort or pain during sexual intercourse unless the woman is already having cramps, which sometimes occur during the first few weeks after insertion. Sexual intercourse cannot displace an IUD.

Sometimes a man can feel the strings if they are too long. If this bothers him, cutting the strings shorter should solve the problem. Sometimes a man can also feel discomfort if the strings are cut too short. To remedy the problem, the provider can cut them even shorter so they are not coming out of the cervical canal.

The woman should be told beforehand, however, that this will mean she may not be able to feel the strings to check her IUD, and removing her IUD may be more difficult. Alternatively, she can have the IUD replaced with a new one and the strings cut to the correct length. The strings should be cut so that 3 centimeters hang out of the cervix.

A man may feel discomfort during sex if the IUD has started to come out through the cervix. If a woman suspects this, she should see a doctor or nurse immediately. Proper counselling of the male partner may be appropriate. Many women do not want to use the IUD because they incorrectly believe that the IUD should not be used by women who are young or who have not had children.

There is no minimum or maximum age requirement for using the IUD. An IUD should be removed after menopause has occurred — at least 12 months after her last monthly bleeding. There is also no requirement that a woman must have children to use the IUD. A history of pelvic infection or multiple sex partners one indication that a woman is at high risk for STIs make the choice of an IUD inappropriate for such women. The myth that young women and women without children cannot use IUDs stems from fears about a higher risk of expulsion in these women and fears about a higher risk of infection in these women.

Expulsion is more likely in certain circumstances, such as young age at insertion under 20 or 25 years old. Some studies also have found a higher rate of expulsion among women who have no children. The additional risk of expulsion, however, is not sufficient to deny IUDs to women in these circumstances, because the advantages of the IUD outweigh the risks of expulsion.

Women with current gonorrheal or chlamydial infection should not have an IUD inserted. Rather, the provider can discuss risky behaviors or situations in their communities that they think are most likely to expose women to STIs, for example having more than one sexual partner in the last three months without always using condoms.

The client can think about whether such situations occurred recently in the past 3 months or so. Breadcrumb Home Blogs.

Multiload sexual

Multiload sexual

Multiload sexual