Metal stamping lube application methods-MetalForming Magazine

Effective application of die lubricants typically is overlooked in many stamping facilities. Many companies try to get by with applying as little lubricant as possible, just so they don't have to deal with the mess. However, metal stampers need to move away from thinking of in-die lubrication as a necessary evil and instead view it as a powerful tool that, when applied effectively, can improve die life, press speed, and part quality. In many applications, the lubricant first is applied to the stock. Some companies use roller coaters for this job.

Metal stamping lube application methods

Metal stamping lube application methods

Their stories will be covered here. In Jain, V. The "dry lube" process can reduce your cost if your parts are required to be free of all oils at the time of delivery. The Tribology process generates friction which requires the use of a lubricant to protect the tool and die surface from scratching or galling. The process is usually carried out on Metal stamping lube application methods metalbut can also be used on other materials, such as polystyrene. However, for operations in which the lubricant must be reapplied in the die, spray lubrication often is required. Stamping is usually done on Jenny madison nude metal sheet.

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While the concept of stamping sheet metal components has traditionally focused on the macro level e. Free xxx adult sex minigames system mixes and delivers one lubricant compound at two different mix ratios. Even the finest lubricant will not prevent tool wear if it does not get to the tool when needed. Metal stamping lube application methods — ounces per gallon, depending upon smoothness of metal, severity of the draw and coating weight desired. This Website Uses Cookies By closing this message or continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy. March As high humidity does not have the adverse effect encountered with common borax soap compounds, softening of the film gumming and metal corrosion with DRY LUBE are negligible. They include plant and mineral oil based, animal fat or lard based, graphite based, soap and acrylic based dry films. This prevented oil from saturating the punches and sucking the slugs up out of the die. We were pulling slugs and experiencing misfeeds.

Stamping also known as pressing is the process of placing flat sheet metal in either blank or coil form into a stamping press where a tool and die surface forms the metal into a net shape.

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  • Most metal forming operations use lubricants to protect the tooling and part from excessive wear caused by scuffing, scratching, scoring, welding, and galling.
  • ACEMCO manufacturing campus has developed processes to manufacture your parts without the aid of adding a wet lubricant.
  • The manifold is connected to the press controls.
  • Precision stamping is a fast and cost-effective solution for manufacturing large quantities of complex products.
  • From light to heavy duty metal forming applications, AFT, Inc.

Effective application of die lubricants typically is overlooked in many stamping facilities. Many companies try to get by with applying as little lubricant as possible, just so they don't have to deal with the mess. However, metal stampers need to move away from thinking of in-die lubrication as a necessary evil and instead view it as a powerful tool that, when applied effectively, can improve die life, press speed, and part quality.

In many applications, the lubricant first is applied to the stock. Some companies use roller coaters for this job. However, for operations in which the lubricant must be reapplied in the die, spray lubrication often is required see Figure 1. If possible, spray line and nozzle location should be determined during die design see Figure 2. If that cannot be done, the next step is trial and error. During the initial setup stages of running a new die, magnetic-base spray assemblies can be used to determine the best placement for the nozzles.

Once determined, the hard plumbing for the spray lines and nozzles can be installed. Locating a central manifold on the die will assist quick die setup. From the manifold, all lines are routed to each spray location and hard-plumbed to the die. For large dies or applications that require longer spray lines, consideration must be given to the type of spray line that will be used. For these applications and ones that require the use of a high-viscosity lubricant, a harder or rigid spray line typically is recommended.

A soft spray line could result in a loss of line pressure, producing a less effective spray pattern. Proper punch lubrication sometimes may require introducing the lubricant directly onto the punch, rather than spraying it see Figure 3.

A groove is machined in the stripper plate of the tool, allowing the lubricant to be pumped directly onto the tool. This allows the lubricant to fill the groove and "weep" around the punch. If space is limited, spray nozzles may be buried in the die.

Figure 4 illustrates three spray nozzles mounted in the bottom of the die. In this process, the lubricant is applied to the bottom of the part before the extrude station of the tool. Using one pump to feed multiple spray lines is not recommended because it can cause unequal distribution. The spray nozzle closest to the pump typically receives an adequate amount of lubricant, while the location farthest from the pump doesn't receive enough.

For best results, each spray line and nozzle should be supplied by its own pump or valve. Also, the use of couplings and other fittings to extend the length of spray lines may cause ineffective spray patterns, points of restriction, and leaks.

Pumping high-viscosity lubricants can require higher pressure and thus a higher-pressure-rated spray line, such as hard nylon, copper, or steel. Containment of lubricants is critical when they are applied to the stock and in the die. When companies allow lubricant to fall and build up on the floor, they not only are spending a lot of money on lubricant, but they're also risking possible injuries to their employees. Spray nozzles can be mounted with magnetic bases in the press window area, but then lubricant containment becomes a challenge.

One option in this case is a spray cabinet or chamber. The cabinet is an enclosure that incorporates nozzles and works in conjunction with a spray system. In this noncontact method, only the lubricant comes in contact with the stock. The spray is contained in the cabinet, and any excess that is captured may be recycled. Since the cabinet usually is mounted to the feeder, it moves with the feeder when the passline is adjusted.

Die space enclosures die doors are a practical method for lubricant containment in the die area see Figure 5. Die doors contribute to the cleanness and safety of the pressroom. Not only do they help contain the lubricant, but they also provide a point-of-operation barrier guard.

Sometimes enclosures eliminate the need for additional guarding, such as light curtains. When sprayed, die lubricants, especially water-soluble ones, can create a lubricant mist. In many cases, this mist is actually the steam produced when water hits the hot tooling or part surface see Figure 6.

The steam carries lubricant into the air and through the pressroom, where it settles on floors and equipment. In addition to using die doors, some companies install exhaust or filtering systems to evacuate the vapors. Collecting the lubricant is a crucial step in the lubrication process, especially if the lubricant can be used again. Companies should plan for the lubricant runoff and develop a collection system.

Today many press manufacturers supply troughs around the bed of the press for lubricant collection see Figure 7. Existing presses can be retrofitted with troughs fairly easily. Once collected in the trough, the lubricant can be routed to a central collection area, such as the press pit.

It can then be pumped out and used again or held as waste lubricant. If the lubricant will be used again, it must be filtered first. Many spray lubrication systems are equipped with their own filters. A spray cabinet also can assist with lubricant collection. The lubricant then can be routed to the central collection area or directly back to the spray lubrication system.

The application and handling of die lubricants are critical in all metal stamping facilities. Of the many benefits associated with proper lubrication, however, the most important is the effect it has on employees. No one wants to work in a messy, unorganized facility, but implementing lubricant containment procedures takes a lot of commitment and cooperation from all employees.

Companies must be patient in implementing these practices, but it is worth the effort. Stan Reineke is sales and marketing manager with Pax Products Inc. Box , Celina, OH , , fax , sreineke paxproducts. Pax Products is a manufacturer of in-die lubrication systems and under-die conveyors.

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Tube and Pipe Fabrication. Tube and Pipe Production. Waterjet Cutting. Digital Edition. Our Publications. Figure 1 In many applications, the lubricant first is applied to the stock. However, for operations in which the lubricant must be reapplied in the die, spray lubrication often is required. Die Lubrication Methods In many applications, the lubricant first is applied to the stock. Figure 2 If possible, spray line and nozzle location should be determined during die design. About the Publication.

You May Also Like. Sign up and be the first to know about the latest industry news, products, and events! This Week's Trending Articles 1. Welcome back! Please sign into your acccount Email. Remember Me. Forgot Password. Figure 3 Proper punch lubrication sometimes may require introducing the lubricant directly into the punch, rather than spraying it. Figure 4 If space is limited, spray nozzles may be buried in the die.

Fabricators and Manufacturers Association. Piercing and cutting can also be performed in stamping presses. Here, spray nozzles, mounted to magnetic bases, apply lubricant directly onto punches from the side of a die installed on a Bruderer ton high-speed press. Boundary lubricants work up to a certain temperature and pressure, and then the boundary additive breaks down and metal contacts metal. The oil was being squeezed off the punch, and the punch galled up and eventually welded and broke off in the extruded hole. About the Publication.

Metal stamping lube application methods

Metal stamping lube application methods

Metal stamping lube application methods. Lubricant Properties

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Choosing a Metal-Forming Lubricant

Synthetic, semi-synthetic, soluble, pure oil—the lubricant choices available to metalformers can be overwhelming. Selection depends on numerous criteria, including the nature of the process, the application method, the workpiece material, and the part-finish required. As metalformers demand more from their tools, the best formulation will do much more than just lubricate the tool-workpiece interface. It should cool the die and protect it from wear, and ensure the appropriate part finish.

In addition, metal forming companies must seek ways to conserve lubricant, through more precise application methods, while ensuring optimal performance. This conference updates attendees on new lubricants for stamping and tool and die machining, and helps them evaluate new formulations. Attendees also gain an understanding of the various techniques available for applying lubricant. The registration process is completed on another website. You will be directed to ebusiness. Additional Sponsorships Available.

PMA Services, Inc. Home :: Contact :: Sitemap :: Advertise. Terms and Conditions. The official publication of Precision Metalforming Association. Subscribe My Online Account. Topics include: Lubricant selection and use-working within automotive and appliance OEM requirements Part-cleaning fundamentals Green initiatives Matching the lubricant to the workpiece material How to evaluate new lubricants for the pressroom Lubricants for lightweighting Techniques for measuring lubricant thickness Developing an overal QA strategy for ensuring reliable sheet metal lubrication Applying internet of things technology to your lubrication strategy REGISTER NOW If you are not attending, but need to register others.

Metal stamping lube application methods

Metal stamping lube application methods