Blues licks tabs-BLUES LICKS IN AM TAB by Lessons - Scales @ haasland.com

Today I will teach you three cool blues licks to spice up your improvisation skills. There are a lot of blues licks out there that sound a little ordinary so here are some cool blues ingredients to make your improvisation sound more alive. The licks are all derived from the A minor pentatonic scale, so you can play the licks over an A blues chord progression or a song in Am. I wrote down the tabs tablature below. Check out the video to hear what they sound like and how to position your fingers.

Good luck. Use the licks I recommend at least Blues licks tabs minutes of jamming Bluees a backing track every day. This visualization technique is super effective and helping you develop the language and letting it flow. Initially this transfer happened by ear but nowadays a lot of people rely on tablature. There are a lot of blues licks out there that sound a little ordinary so here are some cool blues ingredients to make your improvisation sound more alive. The quarter-note bend that begins each beat imparts an elastic feel that is quite captivating. This shouldn't come as a suprise, as this last note is derived from the minor scale instead of the previous notes from the major scale. Beyond single-note lines and double-stops, some of the most enjoyable types of country-fried licks result from copping the sounds of a pedal-steel guitar.

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The resulting dyad A—C provides the 5th and b7th of the IV chord, reinforcing its bluesy, dominant 7th flavor. Pentatonic licks are a key characteristic of authentic-sounding blues. Start with your ring finger, using it for the full-step bend and the repeat of the root A. But Blues licks tabs importantly, you should listen to the music you like, just as atbs as you practice it. Two direct stylistic descendants of B. King and Albert King—used such idiosyncratic phrasing and scale Blues licks tabs that guitar scholars named a pair of tans patterns after them: the B. Home Technique Soloing. The quarter-note bend that begins each beat imparts an elastic feel that is quite captivating. The bends to the b5th Eb and the b7th G tantalize our auditory nerves before resolving smoothly to the 4th Dwhich is the root of the IV chord. Guitar Aficionado. Good luck. Try lics the same Great ass shaking. Use one continuous upstroke to zip down the run to the 5th E.

What could you possibly gain from it?

  • What could you possibly gain from it?
  • For those willing to pay their dues and play the blues, these licks are a rite of passage and a continuous source of inspiration.
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As an aspiring blues guitarist it is really important to create a 'bag of tricks' filled with guitar licks. When listening to the best blues guitarists you'll notice that there are several famous licks they use all of the time.

This is the reason why the collection of these famous licks is a crucial aspect in your own development as a guitarist. All great blues master guitarists use them in their own solos, so neglecting this aspect is a huge loss for anyone who tries to play blues guitar. The blues consists out of a lot of famous guitar licks that were transferred from one guitarist to another.

Initially this transfer happened by ear but nowadays a lot of people rely on tablature. Tablature is therefore a very useful tool, nevertheless that learning licks purely from tab makes no sense at all. It is important to know where the lick comes from so you can use the lick in every musical situation. The first blues lick to learn on guitar is derived from the famous master blues guitarist Freddy King.

Listen to his song 'Hide Away' and you will clearly notice the lick that is analysed below. The blues lick below seems very easy at first but should not be underestimated rhythmically. This simply means that the accent lays in between the beats and you have to start the lick at the upbeat from beat one. In beat two you have to make use of a triplet rhythm so you play three notes here. Combining binary and ternary rhythms is one of the skills that will enrich your phrasing skills remarkably.

The technicality of this blues lick is not of the most difficult nature. The techniques required to play the lick are simply a hammer-on and vibrato technique. By doing so you can make use of other types of dynamics into your guitar playing which aren't otherwise possible. The reason why blues music has such a unique sound lays in the fact that the tonality changes a lot from minor to major sounds. In this first blues lick we combine the minor pentatonic scale and major pentatonic scale:.

This shouldn't come as a suprise, as this last note is derived from the minor scale instead of the previous notes from the major scale. This second blues lick sounds very tasty due to the use of double stops. A double stop technique simply means that there are two notes on adjacent strings played at the same time. This specific double stop is a must to learn for every guitarist who wants to play blues as it is literally the most used double stop in the whole blues scene.

Make sure to take a look at the video so you know how this second blues lick sound. Just like the first blues lick, this second lick is a mixture of both major and minor sounds. In the next scale diagrams you can clearly see which notes from the tablature above belong to which corresponding parts of the minor and major pentatonic scale:. You must gain the knowledge of the scale where the lick is derived from. If not, you will end up using the lick in a wrong context.

For example, playing these licks in a minor blues setting will end very bad. The two blues licks we analysed in this article are on the other hand perfect to use over dominant seven chords such as the ones used in a standard 12 bar blues. Once your bag of guitar tricks is filled with these two very famous and important blues licks, it is essential that you start using them in a musical situation such as an improvisation.

If you listen to blues music you will notice that a lot of classic blues licks return all the time, not as separate licks but they are combined into one bigger lick. The only addition to the two licks is the note that is indicated with the blue circle. This note is the high e string and also the root note of the E minor and the E major pentatonic scale, which makes it perfect to use as a glue to form one compelling blues lick out of the two smaller licks.

While learning blues guitar licks is an important step to take, you'll need more than this. You need to know exactly how to play each lick over any chord. Playing the exact right notes at the exact right time so they fit the underlying chords is a very important skill. A lot of blues guitar students make the mistake thinking that they can just transpose licks to play over any chord, but this just sounds horribly wrong.

Best Blues Guitar Lessons Online. Famous Blues Guitar Lick 1 The blues consists out of a lot of famous guitar licks that were transferred from one guitarist to another.

Take a look at the video to get a clear hang of the sound of this guitar lick. Famous Blues Guitar Lick 2 A. How To Use Your Blues Licks During Improvisations Once your bag of guitar tricks is filled with these two very famous and important blues licks, it is essential that you start using them in a musical situation such as an improvisation.

Guitar Aficionado. This will help you develop an intuitive sense of continuity in improvisation and composition. Check out our top six tips for better guitar playing. Guitar Aficionado. Resolving to the root A of the I chord allows us the opportunity to follow with a lick that can chart an entirely new course, which is exactly what we see next. A quick run through these shapes will help wake up our hands and minds.

Blues licks tabs. Vinyl Treasures: Buddy Emmons' 'Emmons Guitar Inc'

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3 Cool Blues Licks To Spice Up Your Improvisation - GUITARHABITS

These 5 licks use only notes from the Minor Pentatonic, and incorporate string bending as most blues licks do! They're all very very common licks that you'll find most blues players using, so you want to 'put these in your bag' right away. For this lesson just work on playing them - getting the bends in tune and playing them over and over until you feel comfortable with them. Next lesson we'll be looking at how to use them effectively!

P1 - Lick 1 This lick is only 3 notes long but uses a bend, a curl and so is a great first word : It's in the style of the great Albert King who was a real master of string bending! P1 - Lick 2 This is a real classic lick, most used by the incredible Jimi Hendrix, this will help you learn to mute the string after the bend because if you mess that up it will sound awful!

P1 - Lick 3 This is probably one of the most used licks in the Blues vocabulary! It's used many different ways by many different artists, can be played slow or fast, softly or aggressively and I would say it's a must learn if you want to play the blues. P1 - Lick 4 In this lick we have a bend followed by the same note on the next string which is helpful for you getting your bend in tune. It's another very commonly used 'word' and you'll find many variations of it used by many artists.

P1 - Lick 5 The main feature of this lick is the roll between strings 2 and 3 and the 'Blues Curl' on the note C F5:S3 - shorthand for Fret 5, String 3 and it's amazing how much getting a good curl makes the lick sound awesome - we'll be looking at Curls in more detail later in the module! These suggested practice ideas should be incorporated into your intermediate practice routine.

Try not to neglect other areas of you playing when you are learning something new! Lick Practice I recommend that you work on the licks, one at a time, and try to get them memorized so that you can play them without thinking about them. Practice slow, and make sure your bends are in tune and your timing is solid.

Although you can mess about with the rhythm, it should be a specific rhythm, not just 'free'. Timing is VERY important in the blues. How do you think the great masters can play incredible solos with so few notes? Because their time is awesome!

Do this outside your practice time, just a few times a day, try and go through all five licks in your mind - can you recall what they sound like and how to move your fingers to make those sounds? This visualization technique is super effective and helping you develop the language and letting it flow. If you can't remember them, take a sneaky quick look at the tab and then try to hear them in your mind.

Use the licks I recommend at least 5 minutes of jamming with a backing track every day. Start with just one lick and play it over and over again and explore the lick 'as written' and when you start to get bored, try experimenting with the rhythm or the note order.

Can you spend the whole 5 minutes exploring one lick? But work up to playing all 5 licks over a backing track in the key of A and trying to link them together. Listen out for them. In your blues listening 30 mins a day if you can keep an ear out for these licks, they're pretty common, so see if you can pick them out.

Maybe you'll hear the way different players play them, and how they have explored them and changed the notes or time a bit Have some fun using them over the backing tracks now but we'll be looking at more ways of practising your licks effectively in a couple of lessons time.

The next lesson we're going to look a little more at Vibrato In The Blues and how to practice it! Remember that listening to great Blues is an essential part of the course, so try and check out all my recommended albums, they're the best of the best! Albert King played his guitar upside down with the thin string at the top. String bending is a bit easier this way pulling down and so Albert's unique style is based around incredible string bending. He was a huge influence on all that followed, his licks were copied and explored extensively.

Buy at Amazon. You jam over it and if you enjoy it, please consider buying the rest of the album, they're all great fun for jamming! You could have some fun trying out your new licks over this backing track Dig the lessons? Donations keep them free : click here! Please submit it. This will help me make constant improvements to better your experience. Difficulty: Blue. Views: , Save for later. In Progress.

Mark as Complete. Lick TABs So here we have our first 5 words!! This is a big day : P1 - Lick 1 This lick is only 3 notes long but uses a bend, a curl and so is a great first word : It's in the style of the great Albert King who was a real master of string bending!

Lick Practice These suggested practice ideas should be incorporated into your intermediate practice routine. Next Up Have some fun using them over the backing tracks now but we'll be looking at more ways of practising your licks effectively in a couple of lessons time.

Recommended Album Remember that listening to great Blues is an essential part of the course, so try and check out all my recommended albums, they're the best of the best! The Blues Language.

Minor Pentatonic Pattern 1. Bending Technique In Blues. Blues Vibrato. Using Blues Licks Effectively. Minor Pentatonic Pattern 2. The Blues Curl on the Flat 3rd. Introducing The Blues Scale.

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