Brick flashing intersecting roof wall-Flashing: Roof/Wall Intersections

As the technical services manager of the Brick Industry Association BIA in the Southeast region, one facet of my responsibility is to conduct jobsite investigations on both commercial and residential masonry installations when something goes awry. It is rare for my presence to be requested on a site where things have gone well. One of the issues about which I am most often contacted is water penetration into structures where brick veneer intersects with a roof — in areas such as gables, bay windows and chimneys. Some masons still do not understand that a single wythe of masonry should never be expected to be the sole provider of protection against water penetration. It is to be expected that some water might penetrate brick, or other masonry veneer, during a wind-driven rain event.

Brick flashing intersecting roof wall

You can see it in this photo if you look at the base of the sidewall just to the left of the downspout termination. The second piece should not be fastened to the base, so the two pieces can move against each other independently when the roofing materials shift with seasonal change. Chimney flashing installation demands the skill of an experienced installer because even the tiniest crack can allow a tremendous amount of water to leak into the chimney. Photo 3. Some common locations are where vent pipes, roof drains, roof vents, or Adult webmasters cfp are installed. Since these locations generally tend to be subjected to greater movement, flashing needs to be installed in such a way that it allows for this fluctuation. Photo 4. The composition flashing is extended up a cant strip then up the wall at least 10". New Flashing in Existing Brick Wall This detail Brick flashing intersecting roof wall how new copper flashing is installed in an existing brick wall.

View private myspace yopress. Flashing: Roof/Wall Intersections

Also, new flashing can be exceptionally shiny, especially in contrast to the earthy brick walls of many homes. See Photo 1 and Photo 2 — base flashing with counter-flashing caulked where it intersects with the veneer. Field inspection worksheets are included at the back of the volume. More Info. This task should be included in the contract for the appropriate trade depending Hot footballers naked the workflow at the fladhing job site. However with newer siding surfaces such as fiber cement and vinyl siding, there may be no visible Brick flashing intersecting roof wall signs of damage even when water is pouring into the wall during every storm event Brifk causing interior rot and mold inside the wall cavity. Ihtersecting Masonry Restoration Best Practices. Organization s : Building Science Corporation. Last Revision February 27, If you are not reroofing, alternate the flashing with the existing shingles. It is rare for my presence to be requested on a site where things have gone well. A Look at Roof Design. Always check the roof flashing and the condition of walll shingles whenever you clean your gutters.

Description: Copper flashing is used wherever a wall intersects a roof.

  • Log in or register to create Field Kits and Sales Worksheets.
  • Anywhere surfaces intersect on a roof is a prime spot for water seepage.
  • It is because the intersection between the roof and the exterior wall covering is not properly installed and flashed.
  • When the roof of an addition, garage, porch or patio meets a brick wall, the intersection creates a number of concerns.
  • As the technical services manager of the Brick Industry Association BIA in the Southeast region, one facet of my responsibility is to conduct jobsite investigations on both commercial and residential masonry installations when something goes awry.

As the technical services manager of the Brick Industry Association BIA in the Southeast region, one facet of my responsibility is to conduct jobsite investigations on both commercial and residential masonry installations when something goes awry.

It is rare for my presence to be requested on a site where things have gone well. One of the issues about which I am most often contacted is water penetration into structures where brick veneer intersects with a roof — in areas such as gables, bay windows and chimneys.

Some masons still do not understand that a single wythe of masonry should never be expected to be the sole provider of protection against water penetration. It is to be expected that some water might penetrate brick, or other masonry veneer, during a wind-driven rain event. This is a non-issue if a water-resistive building wrap and flashings are properly installed, and a relatively clear airspace is provided behind the veneer.

Any water that penetrates into the wall assembly is quickly directed back to the outside. Notice how the edition of the International Residential Code IRC addresses what ultimately provides protection against water penetration into a home:. The exterior wall envelope shall be designed and constructed in a manner that prevents the accumulation of water within the wall assembly by providing a water-resistant barrier behind the exterior veneer as required by Section R To collect water that penetrates brick veneer, and to direct it back to the exterior of the wall, Section R It is easy to see why such flashing is commonly referred to as thru-wall flashing.

Thru-wall flashing originates with a vertical leg in contact with the exterior sheathing — tucked or shingled up under the house wrap — and a horizontal leg that extends all the way through the masonry to the exterior surface of the wall.

Most mason contractors are diligently installing flashing and weep holes at the base of walls, as well as at the window head and sill. However, typically in gables, the flashing installed consists of a base flashing and a counter flashing.

But flashing that extends through the veneer and weep holes are often omitted. See Photo 1 and Photo 2 — base flashing with counter-flashing caulked where it intersects with the veneer. The International Residential Code IRC does include a detail showing how to support masonry veneer in a gable see Figure 1 , but this detail is very hard to install properly.

In order to get through-wall flashing in place using the IRC detail, a series of pans would need to be fabricated and installed as shown in Photo 3 and Photo 4.

This involves a high degree of difficulty and possible failure. The detail that I have developed and used with great success can be seen in Figure 2. This installation utilizes a one-piece flashing that serves as both thru-wall and counter-flashing, and can be made in lengths up to 10 feet with a lightweight metal break see Photo 5 , Photo 6 , and Photo 7.

This detail has been fully tested in a nationally recognized research center see Photo 8 and Photo 9. The rate of water exiting the weeps decreased as the slope increased for the BIA-Southeast Region flashing detail test panels.

The photos and information contained herein can only establish a partial explanation of the BIA detail and the testing that was undertaken. One thing for sure, if contractors continue to encounter water penetration issues with masonry veneer applications, they will tend to lean toward using some other type of cladding material. That is the very last thing I want to see happen.

He can be contacted at or blight bia. Recently, CCPD continued its mission by opening the Southlake DPS North Training Facility, a nearly 30,square-foot campus that offers emergency response and serves as the training facility for the next generation of police officers and firefighters.

Artisan Masonry Inc. Complete with firing range, police and fire departments, medical center, auditorium and classrooms, Southlake DPS North Training Facility has a look created by alternating courses of recessed and protruding bricks of various colors, along with stacked bond arches large enough to accommodate fire engines. In addition, cast stone panels and cast stone cornice were used to accent doors, windows and walls.

We use QUIKRETE on all of our projects because of the consistency of their colors and strengths, which is very important in doing an intricate project of this nature. In addition to enhanced productivity and reduced labor costs on the project, the use of a bulk mortar silo system helped minimize construction waste. Return to Table of Contents. Skip to content. February Brick and Block By Bryan Light Figure 1 As the technical services manager of the Brick Industry Association BIA in the Southeast region, one facet of my responsibility is to conduct jobsite investigations on both commercial and residential masonry installations when something goes awry.

Notice how the edition of the International Residential Code IRC addresses what ultimately provides protection against water penetration into a home: R Test panels constructed using the IRC detail and typical construction practices were built and tested in the lab.

Additionally, an alternate flashing detail was evaluated and compared to both the IRC detail and typical construction practices. This probably had to do with the slope of the actual flashing in the wall. Summary A direct comparison of test panels with roof slopes showed that both the IRC and BIA-Southeast Region test panels offered effective protection against water penetration while the typical construction test panel did not.

No water penetration was noted on any of the test panels constructed with the BIA-Southeast Region detail. Translation: Tip de contratista Julio, Government Affairs. You Want a Job in Keeping Workers Safe Through Communication. Masonry Restoration: Brick, Stone, and The Business of Ballistics: Why Designing an Adhered Masonry Veneer Contractor Tip Of The Month A Key Ingredient Missing from Quench Jobsite Thirst with this The Masonry Foundation Awards First Jobsite Vehicle Spec Off.

Real-Time Renderings Become Reality with Restoring St. Anthony Hall at Historic Masonry Restoration Best Practices. Technical Talk with David Biggs.

Facebook Twitter Youtube. Photo 1. Photo 2. Photo 3. Photo 4. Photo 5. Photo 6. Photo 7. Photo 8. Photo 9. In , the City of Southlake, Texas, established the Crime Control and Prevention District CCPD as a resource for reducing crime, increasing public safety and improving quality of life for its residents.

Install step and kick-out flashing at roof-wall intersections Remove existing siding and shingles at roof-wall intersection. This detail has been fully tested in a nationally recognized research center see Photo 8 and Photo 9. Also, remember that both temperature and humidity can cause roofing materials shingles, wood sheathing, flashing to expand and contract with seasonal changes. Skip to main content. It is because the intersection between the roof and the exterior wall covering is not properly installed and flashed. Besides, anyone can tell from 2 blocks away that you have a Veneer on your walls if you do not see metal. Along the wall, remove or cut away siding a few inches up the wall.

Brick flashing intersecting roof wall

Brick flashing intersecting roof wall

Brick flashing intersecting roof wall

Brick flashing intersecting roof wall. Recommended Articles

Closer Look at Flashing. For pitched roofs regardless of the application or type of flashing used, the purpose of flashing is to direct the flow of water that leaks into the intersection down and away from the interior of the structure to the topside of the roofing material.

In every case, the top edge of the flashing passes underneath the underlayment, the upper pieces of flashing pass over the lower pieces, and the lower edge of the flashing always passes over the top of the roofing material. In such a manner, the flashing never directs the flow of water to the bottom side of the underlayment, never putting it in contact with the wood structural panel sheathing.

Val ley flashing protects the valleys where two roof planes meet. Step flashing protects the joints between the roof deck and chimneys or dormers. Vent pipe flashing fits over flues or pipes. The shape of vent flashing is typically a cylinder with a wide flange at the base, which is lapped into the shingles as the roofing is installed. Drip edges are strips of flashing material that run along roof eaves and rakes to prevent water from seeping under the finished roof along its edges.

The majority of roof leaks occur in locations where the plane of the roof is interrupted by a ridge, another roof intersecting at an angle, a wall or penetration. Even the simplest of rooflines has dozens of potential leaks sites due to chimneys, ridges, valleys, etc. Proper detailing around these areas, as detailed in the diagrams, is critical to prevent these leaks. Metal flashing material is generally soldered or brazed. Similar towelding, the brazing process bonds two pieces of metal into one single piece.

In many cases, flashing components have to wrap around corners or be spliced together, and in these cases they can be soldered or brazed to ensure a strong, durable joint. Also, remember that both temperature and humidity can cause roofing materials shingles, wood sheathing, flashing to expand and contract with seasonal changes.

The flashing materials will continue to be leak-proof if they can withstand this movement of the roofing materials. Well engineered and properly installed two-part flashing can handle this movement with no problem. Two-part flashing systems consist of a base flashing—often step-flashing—that is laced into the finished roof material. The base is then covered by another metal flashing piece lapped over it. The second piece should not be fastened to the base, so the two pieces can move against each other independently when the roofing materials shift with seasonal change.

Attention to Detail. Keep in mind that flashing details are a very technical aspect of roof construction, and this type of work is best left to experienced professionals. The best way to learn proper flashing techniques is to spend time with an experienced craftsman as he installs a complete roof. That being said, here are a couple of flashing tips that even an inexperienced homeowner should make note of.

Always check the roof flashing and the condition of the shingles whenever you clean your gutters. Look for loose nails and any damage to the seals at the edges of the flashing. Roofing cement can dry out and crumble away, exposing joints to water.

Fasten loose nails and cover exposed nail heads with roofing cement. Renew flashing seals by chipping out old caulking and mortar along the edges of the flashing. Recaulk the joints between the roof and the flashing. Badly corroded flashing will need to be replaced. Flashing must be installed at …wall and roof intersections and at built-in gutters. Section N Additions, alterations, renovations, or repairs shall conform to the provisions of this code, without requiring the unaltered portions of the existing building to comply with this code.

See code for additional requirements and exceptions. Appendix J regulates the repair, renovation, alteration, and reconstruction of existing buildings and is intended to encourage their continued safe use.

If there is no retrofit-specific information for a section, that heading is not included. Before starting any retrofit project, consult the pre-retrofit assessment guides in the existing homes tool. Missing kick-out and step flashing has been responsible for thousands of dollars worth of damage for homeowners.

Signs of potential trouble include streaks of discoloration, mold or algae along walls below wall-roof intersections, rotting wood, or peeling paint. However with newer siding surfaces such as fiber cement and vinyl siding, there may be no visible exterior signs of damage even when water is pouring into the wall during every storm event and causing interior rot and mold inside the wall cavity. The first step is to inspect the outside of the home and note all roof-wall intersections.

Look for step flashing and kick-out flashing at those roof-wall intersections. The step flashing should extend along the whole length of the roof-wall juncture. The individual pieces of metal flashing should be set so that each piece overlaps the piece beneath it; underlapped pieces can inject water into the wall rather than deflecting water from the wall. The step flashing should be visible below the siding because siding installers should leave a.

This gap can get covered over if the home has been roofed over since the siding was installed, thus building up the roof height. When reroofing, it is best to remove and replace the step flashing to ensure it lays flat and is correctly aligned.

If you are not reroofing, alternate the flashing with the existing shingles. Start from the bottom with kick-out flashing, as described in the Description tab.

Along the wall, remove or cut away siding a few inches up the wall. Fold back any intact existing house wrap and install peel and stick membrane on the wall and roof surface. Install metal flashing that has been bent to a right angle with 5 or more inches extending up the wall and 5 inches extending out along the roof.

Install with one nail placed at the top corner of the flashing on the roof or the house wall, but not both, to allow for movement. Install a strip of house wrap along the step flashing that extends up under the house wrap above and down to an inch above the roof, as shown in the Description tab.

On older homes, if kick-out flashing exists at all, it is often fabricated on site from pieces of flat metal flashing. Inspect existing kick-out flashing to determine if the size and angle are adequate for directing water into the gutter and to see if there are any holes, even pinholes, in the kick-out flashing.

Inspect the walls around the kick-out flashing for holes and for rot. If the kick-out flashing is missing or inadequate, remove and replace it. Prefabricated plastic and metal kick-out diverters are commercially available.

Install as described in the Description tab. Some installers will recommend just cutting a vertical slit into the wall above the end of the gutter and lifting the bottom course of shingles, then sliding the kick-out flashing into that slot and under the shingle. This is a less-than-adequate fix as the flashing will not be properly integrated with the side flashing or house wrap so the potential for future failure is higher and the ability to see and repair current damage is limited.

The end of the gutter should not touch the intersecting wall; there should be a small gap to allow free drainage down the wall. See Compliance tab. Access to some references may require purchase from the publisher. Case study about a new home builder that strives to address health, safety, and durability issues in a hot and humid climate. Code for residential buildings that creates minimum regulations for one- and two-family dwellings of three stories or less.

It brings together all building, plumbing, mechanical, fuel gas, energy and electrical provisions for one- and two-family residences. Dates are not shown for non-dated media. Access dates for referenced, non-dated media, such as web sites, are shown in the measure guide text. Where roofs intersect walls is a critical point for flashing to prevent water leaks and damage.

While wood siding may show evidence of this water intrusion with peeling paint or staining, some wall claddings like fiber cement, vinyl siding, and brick veneer can mask the evidence for years. Flashing and diverters must be correctly integrated with house wrap, cladding, and gutters to avoid water damage. Skip to main content. Log In Register. Building America Solution Center. Enter your keywords. Step and kickout flashing should be installed at all roof-wall intersections to protect the wall and divert rainwater runoff into a gutter.

Install corrosion-resistant flashing pieces that are overlapped shingle fashion. If metal, the flashing should be made of galvanized steel at least 0. Install roof felt prior to installing the step and kick-out flashing.

Install house siding over the step flashing, ending at least one inch above the roof surface. Install shingles over the portion of step flashing on the roof.

When installing metal or rubber membrane roofs, use continuous flashing rather than pieces of step flashing. Install kick-out flashing at the end of a roof-wall intersection to divert water away from the wall and into gutters. Ensure that the kick-out flashing is large enough to handle expected storm water flows. Install boot or collar flashings around all roof penetrations and properly integrate with roof membranes and shingles above and below the penetration.

Figure 1 - Improper flashing can allow rain water into walls, causing significant damage. Figure 2. Apply roof underlayment over roof deck and up sidewall over the rigid foam insulation. Figure 3.

Install shingle starter strip then kick-out diverter as first piece of step flashing. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Apply self-adhesive flashing over the top edge of the wall flashing, the diverter, and the rigid foam insulation. Figure 7. Apply construction tape over the self-adhered flashing. Figure 8. Apply roof underlayment over roof deck and up the sidewall over housewrap. Figure 9. Install shingle starter strip then kick-out diverter; attach to roof deck but not sidewall.

Figure Place first shingle and next section of sidewall flashing over upper edge of diverter. Install remaining sidewall flashing, counter flashing, and shingles.

Apply self-adhesive flashing over top edge of the wall flashing, diverter, and housewrap. Cut housewrap to fit over diverter and tape top of cut. Ensuring Success The site supervisor should visually inspect the step flashing and kickout diverter during installation by trades to ensure that it is properly integrated with other wall and roof elements.

Climate Verify that the kickout diverter is sized appropriately for expected local storm events. Training Right and Wrong Images. Author s : U. Environmental Protection Agency. Organization s : EPA. Publication Date: April, Author s : Fine Homebuilding. Organization s : Fine Homebuilding. Publication Date: August, Author s : MW Alliance. Organization s : MW Alliance. CAD Images. Courtesy Of: DryFlekt, Inc. Download DWG. Download PDF. Compliance The Compliance tab contains both program and code information.

What are the Different Types of Flashing? | Your Own Architect

When building materials intersect, there is the potential for water infiltration. Flashing is a thin material used to prevent water penetration by providing a seal at joints exposed to the weather. There are two general types of flashing used in masonry construction. The first is external flashing exposed flashing and the second is internal flashing concealed flashing. External or exposed flashings prevent moisture from penetrating into masonry walls where the wall intersects the roof.

Internal flashings or concealed flashings, catch water that has penetrated a masonry wall and drain it through weep holes to the outside of the wall. Additionally, internal flashing is required at any location where the cavity is interrupted, such as the heads of windows or doors, and window sills. Flashing is also categorized by the material that it is made from as well as the location of the flashing within a building structure, such as at roof valleys or at chimneys.

Materials used for flashing include copper, galvanized steel. In some cases a combination of these are used, such as galvanized steel covered with bitumen that prevents corrosion of the steel when in contact with mortar. Concealed or external flashing is typically made from sheet metals, bituminous-coated fabrics, plastic, or other waterproof membrane materials.

Exposed flashing is commonly made from aluminum, copper, galvanized steel, zinc, lead, or terne. Some common locations for flashing include roof ridges or valleys, around chimneys, at masonry parapets, gravel stops, and at the head of openings or water tables.

Joint flashing locations generally include expansion and contraction joints as well as the gaps created at the intersections of different materials. Since these locations generally tend to be subjected to greater movement, flashing needs to be installed in such a way that it allows for this fluctuation.

Flashing at roof ridges or valleys can be either concealed or exposed. They are typically attached with screws and neoprene washers on top or in between shingles, depending on whether they are exposed or concealed. Most installations involve the weaving of flashing sheets between roofing shingles.

In exposed valley flashing conditions, cleats with a vee crimp can be used. Lap lengths of flashing at ridges are typically 4 inches mm. At valleys, lap lengths vary depending on the slope and material of the roof.

At slopes of or greater, a 7 inch mm minimum lap length is typically used, while at slopes less than a 10 inch mm minimum lap length is used. Wood shakes and other shingles require a minimum lap length of 11 inches mm.

Whenever the continuity of a roof covering system is penetrated, flashing is required to prevent water infiltration through the opening.

Some common locations are where vent pipes, roof drains, roof vents, or skylights are installed. In addition, any future columns or steel angles used to support signs, flag poles or other items require flashing. Chimney or fireplace flashing is typically installed at the intersection with the roof of a building. Cap flashing applied to the face of the chimney is used along with base flashing at the point of intersection with the roof.

Base flashing usually extends up the chimney wall at least 4 inches mm with minimum sidelaps of 3 inches 75 mm.

Cap flashing overlaps base flashing 4 inches mm and also extends into masonry 4 inches mm. Typical components used in chimney flashing include an underlayment, a metal saddle, step flashing, counter flashings, mortar, and solder to bond the metal workpieces. Masonry parapet walls are usually detailed with base flashing over a cant strip at the point of intersection between the parapet wall and the roof slab and with exposed counter flashing on the face of the parapet wall.

Base flashing typically extends 8 to 12 inches mm to mm above the highest anticipated waterline. A cap or counterflashing is also typically installed so that it laps the base flashing at least 4 inches mm.

Cap flashing terminates in a continuous reglet in concrete walls, or interlocks with a through-wall cap receiver in masonry walls. In addition, continuous through-wall flashing is typically used underneath the coping to prevent leakage through the joints and cracks in the coping.

Gravel stops, which are typical on flat roofs topped with a gravel surface finish, are flashed with a metal gravel stop and hold down cleat that wraps around from the edge of the roof to the face of the roof fascia. Gravel stop flashing typically has a raised perimeter lip to contain gravel on a flat roof.

The drip edge at the bottom of the face directs water away from the structure. Flashing is critical at the heads of openings for windows and doors to prevent water penetration. It is also required at sills to prevent moisture from potentially entering the wall underneath. A drip is commonly used to guide water away from the opening and to prevent capillary action, the natural tendency of water to make its way into joints due to gravity. A height differential slope of at least 6 inches to 9 inches mm to mm is typical from the inside of the wall to the exterior in order to drain any unwanted moisture away from the wall.

When selecting flashing, it is important to take into consideration the durability, appearance, and potential galvanic action due to contact between different metals. Flashing is generally included in sheet metal specifications, which may include scuppers, gutters, downspouts, skylights, and decorative items. Flashing types are categorized by how they are installed, either internal concealed or external exposed. They can also be categorized by the material they are made from or by location: what part of a building they are installed in.

In order to prevent water from leaking into a roof assembly and eventually into the interior of a building, flashing needs to be installed along roof edges, where roofs change slope, and where roofs are penetrated by chimneys, vent pipes, and skylights. Exterior walls must also be flashed where leaking may occur. This includes door and window openings and along joints where materials meet in the plane of a wall.

Flashing Materials Materials used for flashing include copper, galvanized steel. Common Flashing Locations Some common locations for flashing include roof ridges or valleys, around chimneys, at masonry parapets, gravel stops, and at the head of openings or water tables. Roof Ridges and Valleys Flashing at roof ridges or valleys can be either concealed or exposed.

Flashing at Roof Penetrations Whenever the continuity of a roof covering system is penetrated, flashing is required to prevent water infiltration through the opening. Chimneys at Roof Intersection Chimney or fireplace flashing is typically installed at the intersection with the roof of a building. Masonry Parapets Masonry parapet walls are usually detailed with base flashing over a cant strip at the point of intersection between the parapet wall and the roof slab and with exposed counter flashing on the face of the parapet wall.

Gravel Stops Gravel stops, which are typical on flat roofs topped with a gravel surface finish, are flashed with a metal gravel stop and hold down cleat that wraps around from the edge of the roof to the face of the roof fascia.

Flashing at Openings Flashing is critical at the heads of openings for windows and doors to prevent water penetration. Galvanic Action When selecting flashing, it is important to take into consideration the durability, appearance, and potential galvanic action due to contact between different metals. Closing Notes Flashing types are categorized by how they are installed, either internal concealed or external exposed.

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Brick flashing intersecting roof wall

Brick flashing intersecting roof wall

Brick flashing intersecting roof wall